Collision, Kristen Granata

**Review**

Collision, Kristen Granata

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Whew. We all need a little Chase Brooks in our life. The perfect balance of sensitive and manly.

Merritt is a girl after my own heart – Marvel movies, Journey and enough sarcasm to woo Chase Brooks.

Collision is a perfectly executed, unconventional romance that will leave you both satisfied and craving more.

The Seven Husbands Of Evelyn Hugo, Taylor Jenkins Reid

**Review**

The Seven Husbands Of Evelyn Hugo, Taylor Jenkins Reid

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

After finishing Daisy Jones and the Six, I needed more TJR in my life. The Seven Husbands Of Evelyn Hugo did not disappoint.

I was intrigued on page one. I was hooked after the first husband. I couldn’t put the book down.

It was also heartbreaking. The love of her life was someone society refused to accept. For that reason, Evelyn and her true love were kept apart for decades.

The book surprised me in many ways. One, I loved Evelyn Hugo and a few of her husbands. The story was relatable and felt real. I very much wanted all of the characters to be real. In the end, I struggled with Evelyn – should I like her? Should I hate her? I still don’t know.

At its core, this is the story that should inspire you to be true to who you are, society’s expectations be damned.

Ask Again, Yes, Mary Beth Keane

**Review**

Ask Again, Yes, Mary Beth Keane (release date 5/28/19)

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Ask Again, Yes is a gut wrenching family drama about love conquering all. The Stanhopes and the Gleesons begin their tale with Brian and Francis attend the police academy together and ultimately become neighbors. Though not close, their two children, Peter and Katie, begin a friendship and relationship that spans decades.

There is a lot of story packed into this book. It spans decades and generations. Not short on tragedy, Ask Again, Yes was ripe with family drama, relationships, love, personal growth and a long-hard look at mental health in America. The story captivated me, but I wanted more – each character got limited page time, but they were such complex characters that they needed more.

Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an eARC to review.

The Night Before, Wendy Walker

**Review**

The Night Before, Wendy Walker

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

(Release Date 5/14/19)

I’ve read a lot of thrillers lately. A lot. This one stands up. Every single chapter left me wanting more. I didn’t want to put it down, no matter how heavy with sleep my eyes were.

I questioned everyone. I didn’t know who to believe. I wish I could tell you I predicted the outcome, but I’d be lying. Okay, I had a small hunch, but no solid proof until the end.

The Night Before was a cliffhanger until the very end.

An Anonymous Girl

**Review**

An Anonymous Girl, Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Well, I hated Gone Girl. When I saw all the comparisons of An Anonymous Girl to Gone Girl, I almost flat out rejected it. I’m glad I didn’t.

An Anonymous Girl sucked me in from page one and held all the way until the end. It kept me intrigued and guessing. A few twists I was able to predict and unwind from the little bread crumbs left.

The characters were engaging and well developed. I felt their fears and anxieties, which is what kept me hooked and unable to put it down.

 

Me for You, Lolly Winston

**Review**

Me For You, Lolly Winston

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Have you ever found an author whose voice and style resonated and stuck with you? For me, Lolly Winston is one of those authors. Thirteen-ish years ago I read her first two books, Good Grief and Happiness Sold Separately and loved them. I kept looking for a new book from her and was beyond ecstatic when Me For You popped up on Bookstagram. What are the odds a past favorite author releases a new book at the same time I rediscover my love of reading?

Winston has a knack for weaving humor into heavy topics like grief, guilt and loss. She can make you cry, laugh and then cry again all in the same page.

In Me For You, Rudy, Sasha and CeCe felt real and relatable. Their emotions and reactions are genuine. And most importantly, their stories are moving and inspiring.

If you love honest writing and stories about real people, Lolly Winston will never disappoint.

I received an ARC of this book from Gallery Books in exchange for an honest review.

Daisy Jones & the Six, Taylor Jenkins Reid

**Review**

Daisy Jones & the Six, Taylor Jenkins Reid.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

You know that scene in Almost Famous when they all start singing Tiny Dancer? Every time I watch that, it gives me this intense feeling of contentment. I want to be there on that bus singing that song with those people. Then anytime you hear that song, that feeling hits again.

That is exactly how it felt reading Daisy Jones & The Six. 

It’s like hearing the opening riff to your favorite song. Hitting that impossible high note as you’re flying down the interstate. It’s knowing every single word and singing right along with the band. It’s leaving a concert, flying high and feeling like you’re in the band.

Daisy Jones and Billy Dunne are the stuff rock dreams are made of, but it was Graham and Karen that broke my heart. Billy and Daisy were oil and water, but Graham and Karen were rose petals and thorns. They belonged together, but the stem kept the separated – beauty and pain – to keep them on their own paths.

I could read about Daisy Jones & the Six forever. Each character was perfectly flawed. And, I need Reese to hurry up and make this show so I can hear those songs. Please.

On the Come Up, Angie Thomas

**Review**

On The Come Up, Angie Thomas

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

What I love most about Angie Thomas’s writing is how real and honest it is. Bri’s character is expertly written and defined. You feel what she feels. See what she sees. Want what she wants.

On the Come Up is about a girl with dreams, struggles and a bit of an identity crisis. To get what she wants, she has to be who she isn’t and doesn’t want to be. Each step forward is a step further away from herself.

Garden Heights, where The Hate U Give took place, is a phenomenal supporting character. Thomas puts you in the heart of the city. She’s created a world and characters that pull you in and shows you the beauty and pain that resides beyond the landscape the rest of the world sees.

On the Come Up had me laughing one minute, crying the next and then angry at the world. Sometimes all on the same page.

White Fragility, Robin DiAngelo

**Review**

White Fragility, Robin DiAngelo

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

As white people, we are often more concerned with the fear of being labeled a racist than we are the actual damaged caused by subtle, structural and societal racism.

Some criticism I’ve heard since sharing this book calls out the whiteness of the author, furthering the underlying issue that white people are quick to remove themselves from issues of racism, leaving the onus of racism on POC. If we ever want to move our society forward, we, as white people, need to own, address and acknowledge our racism and unwillingness to talk about it. If we as white people cannot own our role in the issue of race, we will never make progress or see the underlying racism in our words, actions and beliefs. White people own racism and it is our responsibility to recognize and address it.

White Fragility challenged me in a positive way, opening my eyes to my own racism. The clarification between how we see racism (white supremacy, KKK, etc.) and what is actually racism (white flight, economic and education inequities, good vs. bad neighborhoods). As a white progressive, I’ve often fallen into many of the traps of white fragility without realizing it. I may never be perfect, but with this knowledge, I can do better and continue educating myself and challenging both white fragility and racism.

Robin DiAngelo expertly navigated the negative impacts of white fragility. I came into this book with an open mind, ready and willing to accept the information presented. Prior to starting it, I made a vow to let down my defenses and actually listen, absorb and accept the information. This is the only way to approach this book – to remove your own white fragility and be willing to hear the truth. 

The Woman I was Before, Kerry Fisher

**Review**

The Woman I was Before, Kerry Fisher

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

I almost didn’t love this book. Kate’s story and mystery kept me intrigued and reading, but it was the twists with Sally and Gisela that hooked me.

In the beginning, I kept turning the page to find out what Kate was hiding. I had an idea, but I wasn’t certain. My assumption in how the reveal would occur was accurate, but despite its predictability, it was still satisfying.

Sally and Gisela were warmer characters, by design, and I could imagine meeting them for coffee or wine. They were relatable and real, despite their high society status and the false pretenses for perfection they touted online.

By the end of The Woman I was Before, I loved all three leading characters. Kate’s story broke my heart, and I felt her raw emotions as she shared the story with her new friends.

The Woman I was Before was charming, heartbreaking and satisfying.